Can communities still water tress?

Yes. The emergency regulation only prohibits irrigating turf (lawn) on public street medians. Trees provide many environmental benefits, such as shade, carbon storage, and animal habitat. Urban trees also reduce heat island effects and associated health impacts, absorb and filter storm water, reduce urban flooding risk, protect air quality, and save energy by shading buildings. For more information on taking care of trees while saving water, see the Save Our Trees section within SaveOurWater.com. 

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1. What water uses are prohibited?
2. What is potable water?
3. Who does this apply to?
4. Are these exceptions from the prohibitions?
5. Can communities still water tress?
6. Who enforces the prohibitions?
7. Where can I report water waste violations?
8. Are there restrictions on filling swimming pools?
9. Where can I find the state's adopted emergency regulation?
10. What is "non-functional turf"?
11. Does the non-functional turf irrigation ban apply to residential properties?
12. Are there any exceptions to the non-functional turf irrigation ban?
13. Who decides if turf is functional?
14. Does the regulation affect trees? Do urban trees need to be watered?
15. What actions may a water supplier or local government (or any entity already authorized to enforce infractions) take to enforce violations of the regulation? What actions may the Board take?
16. Can HOAs or cities enforce their landscaping guidelines that conflict with homeowners’ drought responses?
17. Does this regulation apply to HOAs?